Drug & Medical Devices

IVC filters: 4 things you should know

Each year, doctors implant about a quarter of a million IVC filters into patients at risk for blood clots. New studies have revealed serious dangers associated with these devices. Doctors usually treat blood clots with an anticoagulant, also know as a blood thinner. However, blood-thinning medicines are not safe for some people. If you are at...

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J & J faces thousands of Risperdal lawsuits

More than 5,000 lawsuits have been filed against Johnson & Johnson for failure to warn doctors and consumers that Risperdal can cause boys to grow large breasts, a condition known as gynecomastia. Risperdal Litigation At least 1,500 Risperdal cases have been consolidated in Pennsylvania on behalf of individuals who allege the drug caused excessive male breast...

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Hidden cancer risks for Hysterectomy and Fibroid Removal

Uterine cancer is the fourth most common cancer in women in the United States and the most commonly diagnosed gynecologic cancer[1]. Prior to a hysterectomy or fibroid removal (myomectomy), the FDA estimates that approximately 1 in 350 women have an unsuspected uterine sarcoma, a type of uterine cancer that includes leiomyosarcoma.[2] Stages of Endometrial...

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Elk & Elk Attorneys to Present at NBI Seminar

  Elk & Elk Attorneys to Present at NBI Seminar In the field of personal injury law, it is essential for attorneys and other legal professionals to possess a basic understanding of the human anatomy, types of injuries and common treatment options. An upcoming National Business Institute live seminar featuring presentations from three Elk & Elk attorneys...

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Actos Bladder Cancer Settlement

Pharmaceutical giant Takeda has agreed to a $2.4 billion settlement to compensate plaintiffs who allege they developed bladder cancer after taking the diabetes medication, Actos® (pioglitazone). Officials at Takeda Pharmaceutical Co. said the offer will resolve a “vast majority” of the more than 8,000 Actos bladder cancer claims. In a press release, the company explained,...

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FDA Issues Warning for Low-T Users

Last year, we told you about an alarming new trend: doctors prescribing testosterone replacement therapy for men who may not need it. Now, the FDA has announced that prescription testosterone products are only approved for the treatment of specific medical conditions, not for low testosterone levels due to aging. Additionally, manufacturers of all low-T...

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Dangers of Off-Label Drug Use

We recently reported on the possible dangers of the anti-nausea drug Zofran® and equivalent generics when they are used off-label. But what does “off label” really mean? What is Off-Label Use of Medications? As we explained in an earlier post, “When a drug is used in a way that is different from that described...

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Litigation Update: Transvaginal Mesh & Bladder Slings

For women struggling with incontinence, pelvic organ prolapse and other problems, surgical treatments such as a bladder sling or other procedures using transvaginal mesh (TVM) seemed like a dream come true. Pharmaceutical companies claimed their mesh products would shore up weakened pelvic muscles—supporting internal organs and reducing embarrassing accidents. Sadly, for thousands of women,...

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Zofran Lawsuits

Zofran® and its generic equivalents have been linked to birth defects and other problems when the medication is taken during pregnancy.  The manufacturer, GlaxoSmithKline, promoted the off-label use of the drug as a remedy for morning sickness in addition to its approved use as a drug for controlling nausea and vomiting after chemotherapy and...

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Zofran Linked to Birth Defects

The anti-nausea drug Zofran® has often been prescribed off-label to pregnant women suffering from serious morning sickness.  However, the evidence is growing that taking this drug may cause women to give birth to babies with a variety of birth defects. Zofran was approved in 1991 by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for treating...

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