Navigating Ohio’s Roundabouts

Once found nearly exclusively in Europe, today there are more than 5,000 roundabouts on our nation’s roadways. The first roundabouts were built in the United States over a century ago. Once scarce, their numbers have doubled in the last decade, with hundreds more in the planning stages.

What is a roundabout?

A modern roundabout is a circular intersection where drivers travel counterclockwise around a center island. It replaces traffic lights or stop signs at the intersection. Unlike old-fashioned traffic circles, where incoming traffic had the right of way, in a modern roundabout, drivers must yield to traffic already in the roundabout, then proceed into the intersection and exit at their desired street. Roundabouts are designed to improve traffic flow, reduce accidents, and save energy.

How to drive in a roundabout

Roundabouts are designed to make intersections safer and more efficient for drivers, pedestrians and cyclists. There are two types of roundabouts: Single-lane roundabouts and multi-lane roundabouts.

Driving roundabouts safely
Driving through a single-lane roundabout. Click to enlarge.
(Photo courtesy of Ohio Department of Transportation.)

Important tips for driving roundabouts:

  • Yield to drivers in the roundabout
  • Stay in your lane; do not change lanes
  • Do not stop in the roundabout
    (If you’re in a roundabout when an emergency vehicle also enters, exit the roundabout first, and then pull over.)
  • Avoid driving next to oversized vehicles

Driving in single-lane roundabouts

Roundabouts are marked with a yellow “roundabout ahead” sign with an advisory speed limit for the roundabout. Slow down as you approach the roundabout, and watch for pedestrians in the crosswalk.

Continue toward the roundabout and look to your left as you near the yield sign and dashed yield line on the road at the entrance to the roundabout. Yield to traffic already in the roundabout. Once you see a gap in traffic, enter the circle and proceed to your exit. If there is no traffic in the roundabout, you may enter without yielding. Look for pedestrians and use your turn signal before you exit.

Driving multi-lane roundabouts

In a multi-lane roundabout, you will see two signs as you approach the intersection: The yellow “roundabout ahead” sign and a black-and-white “lane choice” sign. You will need to choose a lane prior to entering the roundabout.

You choose your lane in a multi-lane roundabout the same way you would in a traditional multi-lane intersection. To go straight or right, get in the right lane. To go straight or left, get in the left lane. Drivers can also make U-turns from the left lane.

Driving through multi-lane roundabouts
Driving through a multi-lane roundabout. 
(Photos courtesy of Washington State Department of Transportation.)

 


Sources

What is a Roundabout?” Pages – Roundabouts in District 3. Ohio Department of Transportation. Web. Accessed 9 Sept. 2015.

WSDOT – How to Drive a Roundabout.” WSDOT – Safety. Washington State Department of Transportation. Web. Accessed 4 Sept. 2015.

Elk & Elk Goes Green

Elk & Elk Co., Ltd. is proud to announce its designation as “Green Certified” through the CMBA Green Initiative Certification program for the years 2015-2017.Green Logo - Elk & Elk is Green Certified 2015 - 2017

On October 2, 2015, Elk & Elk was among more than 40 law firms and offices recognized as “Green Certified” during the David Webster Greener Way to Work luncheon, hosted by the Cleveland Metropolitan Bar Association (CMBA).

“Elk & Elk is grateful to be recognized for adopting environmentally sound business practices,” said Dawn Urban, Green Administrator for Elk & Elk. “We applaud the CMBA’s efforts and are proud to join our fellow Green Certification recipients, making a difference in our community by recycling and reducing energy consumption.”

CMBA Green Initiative

The CMBA’s Green Initiative was the brainchild of the late David Webster, a well-regarded Cleveland attorney and environmentalist. In his memory, the Green Initiative Committee (GIC) presents the annual David Webster Greener Way to Work Week, encouraging members of the legal community to find greener ways to commute to work. The GIC also hosts the Greener Way to Work luncheon, which recognizes area law firms, offices and legal support organizations for their commitment to protecting the environment.

Michelle Cook, CMBA 2015 Green Initiative Committee Chair and Colby Sattler of the Western Reserve Land Conservancy
Michelle Cook, 2015 Green Initiative Committee Chair and Colby Sattler of the Western Reserve Land Conservancy. (Photo courtesy of CMBA)

During the luncheon, Michelle Cook, the 2015 GIC Chair, thanked the attendees for practicing efficient energy use. “Everything we do has an impact, be it large or small,” said Cook. “Even if you are only one person, you have the power to enact change. Every tiny decision you make is like a brick, and brick by brick, a whole house is built. Together, the Cleveland legal community is coming together person by person, firm by firm, and together we are making big changes.”

Keynote speaker, Colby Sattler of the Western Reserve Land Conservancy, presented eye-opening statistics and information about the need to Reforest Our City. He shared practical solutions for businesses and individuals to help restore Cleveland’s once lush urban forest, which earned it the moniker, “The Forest City.”

Elk & Elk recognized as Green Certified

To qualify as CMBA Green Certified, Elk & Elk was required to demonstrate that the firm is in compliance with the established criteria below.

Elk & Elk recognized as Green Certified through the CMBA Green Initiative Certification program.
Denise Pickett; Mary Ann Watts; Venera Ilievska & Dawn Urban, Green Administrator, accepting the CMBA Green Certificate on behalf of Elk & Elk Co., Ltd. (Photo courtesy of CMBA)

A.  Paper Reduction – A commitment to 2 of the following 4 efforts to reduce per capita paper use:

  1. Purchasing office paper with at least 30% recycled content
  2. Using double-sided copying and printing, at least for drafts and internal documents
  3. Recycling discarded office paper
  4. Purchasing office paper only from paper manufacturers with sustainable forestry management practices

B.  Energy Reduction – A commitment to reduce office energy use by 10% in the first year of certification

C.  Recycling Program – Must have or form a firm/office program for recycling glass, plastic and e-waste products (toner cartridges, computers, etc.)

D.  Internal Green Committee – Must have or form a firm/office Green Committee or designated administrator to implement the program, interface with the CMBA, and generally encourage environmentally-responsible practices among staff.

Tips for going Green

The CMBA’s Green Initiative Certification program promotes green practices for adoption by law firms, small law offices, solo practitioners, and legal departments of other businesses. However, any business can reduce, recycle and reuse to help our environment.
The CMBA Green Initiative Committee suggests the following activities to save energy:

CMBA Greener Way to Work luncheon
2015 David Webster Greener Way to Work luncheon, hosted by the CMBA. (Photo courtesy of CMBA)
  • Turn off lights, computers, copiers, printers, and other equipment when not in use
  • Replace incandescent or halogen lamps with compact fluorescents (CFT)
  • Use day lighting as much as possible, instead of lights
  • Enable power-down management software on networked computers
  • Make sure screensavers are used
  • Upgrade the ambient fluorescent lighting system by replacing the T12 lamps with more energy-efficient T8 or T5 systems and upgrade exit signs to use light-emitting diode (LED) lamps
  • Use automatic lighting controls such as dimming systems that reduce light when natural daylight is available; and occupancy and motion sensors for, among other things, conference rooms, kitchens, storage rooms, and restrooms. Consider occupancy sensors that power down computer equipment, task lights, and other plug load equipment
  • Educate cleaning crews to shut off miscellaneous items such as office lights, coffee pots, and other equipment when not used

But going green is hard, right?

Remember, the decision to go green doesn’t have to be an “all or nothing” proposition—every little bit helps. As the ancient Chinese philosopher, Lao Tzu, once said, “A journey of a thousand miles begins with a single step.” So, come on! Take that first step and walk with us on our journey to a greener planet.